Knowledgebase: Audio Interfaces
Apple Boot Camp
Posted by Rick Shao on 16 November 2015 06:42 AM

More and more people are buying and loving Macs. To make this choice simply irresistible, Apple will include technology in the next major release of Mac OS X, Leopard, that lets you install and run the Windows XP operating system on your Mac. Called Boot Camp, you can download a public beta today.

As elegant as it gets

Boot Camp lets you install Windows XP without moving your Mac data, though you will need to bring your own copy to the table, as Apple Computer does not sell or support Microsoft Windows.(1) Boot Camp will burn a CD of all the required drivers for Windows so you don't have to scrounge around the Internet looking for them.

Optional alt. At startup, hold down the option key (alt) to choose between Mac OS X and Windows.

Run XP natively

Once you've completed Boot Camp, simply hold down the option key at startup to choose between Mac OS X and Windows. (That's the "alt" key for you longtime Windows users.) After starting up, your Mac runs Windows completely natively. Simply restart to come back to Mac.

What you'll need

  • Mac OS X Tiger v10.4.6 or later (check Software Update)
  • The latest Firmware updates (check Support Page)
  • 10GB free hard disk space
  • An Intel-based Mac
  • A blank recordable CD
  • A printer for the instructions (You'll want to print them before installing Windows, really.)
  • A bona fide installation disc for Microsoft Windows XP, Service Pack 2, Home or Professional (No multi-disc, upgrade or Media Center versions.)

The Boot Camp course

Boot Camp Public Beta provides a straightforward means of letting your Mac run Windows. Here's how it works:

Space maker. Meet the most elegant hard drive utility ever.

  • First, you need to make sure your Intel-based Mac has the latest version of Mac OS X and the latest firmware update. These provide technologies that make Boot Camp possible. It's also wise to print out the Installation & Setup Guide.
  • The Boot Camp burns a CD with the drivers Windows needs to recognize Mac-specific hardware. It is very important to do this before starting the Windows installation.
  • The software also helps you set aside hard drive space for the Windows installation, without moving any of your Mac files around. Just drag the intuitive slider to choose the size that's right for you. Boot Camp also helps you remove the Windows partition, should you so desire.
  • Next, insert your Windows installation disc, restart and follow the Windows installation process. The only tricky part is selecting the C: drive manually. Be sure to get this right, or you could erase your Mac files accidentally. Remember, Apple Computer does not sell or support Microsoft Windows.
  • After the installation process is complete and your Mac has booted Windows, you'll need the Macintosh Drivers CD you burned previously. When you insert the CD, it will automatically install the drivers. Follow the instructions in the Installation & Setup Guide for helpful hints.
  • Don't forget to follow best practices for updating and protecting your Windows system (see "Word to the wise" to right).
  1. You'll need Windows XP Home Edition or Professional, Service Pack 2 installation disc.

Changes in Boot Camp 1.1.2 beta

Boot Camp 1.1.2 beta contains several updates and is intended for all new and previous Boot Camp beta users.

Boot Camp 1.1.2 beta includes:

  • Support for the latest Intel-based Macintosh computers
  • Easier partitioning using presets for popular sizes
  • Ability to install Windows XP on any internal disk
  • Support for built-in iSight cameras
  • Support for built-in microphones
  • Support for the Apple USB Modem
  • Trackpad scrolling and right-click support on Apple Laptops
  • Improved Apple keyboard support including Delete, PrintScreen, NumLock, and ScrollLock keys
  • Improved International Apple keyboard support

Updating to Boot Camp 1.1.2 beta

If you previously installed Boot Camp beta, you can easily update to Boot Camp 1.1.2 beta. You don't need to partition your hard drive again (unless you want to change its size) or reinstall your Macintosh and Windows software or documents, but it's very important to update the Boot Camp Assistant software, create a new Macintosh Drivers for Windows CD and install the updated software it contains on Windows XP. Complete instructions are provided in the Installation and Setup Guide included with the Boot Camp 1.1.2 beta software.

Using Windows on a Mac

Mac hardware operates differently from PCs, and this public beta does not support all features of the Mac in Windows. Learn more about running Windows on a Mac.

Mac OS X Leopard

Get a sneak peak at the other new features in Leopard on the Mac OS X Leopard site. Developers can learn more about Mac OS X Leopard on Apple's Developer site.

EFI and BIOS

Macs use an ultra-modern industry standard technology called EFI to handle booting. Sadly, Windows XP, and even the upcoming Vista, are stuck in the 1980s with old-fashioned BIOS. But with Boot Camp, the Mac can operate smoothly in both centuries.

Word to the Wise

Windows running on a Mac is like Windows running on a PC. That means it'll be subject to the same attacks that plague the Windows world. So be sure to keep it updated with the latest Microsoft Windows security fixes.

Source: Steinberg © 2006 Steinberg Media Technologies GmbH

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